Age doesn’t matter!

Reading about how a book lover re-discovered libraries after several years made me think about the way we look at our customers.

It would be nice if libraries could attract more teenagers and young adults but let’s not forget that there are other important groups of people out there. Ok, most of our customers are older people or young families, but what’s wrong with that? Just because there are times in your life when you don’t fancy using a library, it doesn’t mean that you won’t come back to us later on.

Parents visit us to entertain their young children, older people come in to learn how to use computers or borrow books or meet people. If you’re unemployed you might come along to a job club or to apply for jobs or benefits online, or you might need a book at times of illness or bereavement. Or perhaps you just love reading and want to borrow books every week of your life.

I’m not saying we should stop trying to make our libraries fantastic places for teenagers to hang out in, but just that we shouldn’t be blinded by the cult of youth and undervalue everyone else.

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4 thoughts on “Age doesn’t matter!

  1. JS

    I think part of the problem is libraries just don’t seem to know how to market themselves – do librarians even appoint marketing managers? I never see my local library promoted, I couldn’t even tell you where it was! Local councils, universities and other government-funded institutions all have marketing teams and objectives, libraries don’t seem to make enough noise?

    Reply
    1. blackcountrylibrarian Post author

      You’re right. Individual local libraries tend to do their own marketing and we obviously don’t have our own marketing experts! Councils will do the wider marketing for things like e-books but perhaps that’s not working either. Any suggestions?!

      Reply
      1. JS

        Well what sort of marketing do the Councils do? And what sort of thing do libraries do individually? I’d imagine it’s hard with restricted budgets, but it seems crazy that somewhere that offers books (and film?) for free, that you can borrow indefinitely, struggle to attract customers. Especially young people, who have no money.

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